Cleaning and Sanitizing Wine Making Equipment – WMA007

Cleaning and Sanitizing Wine Making Equipment – WMA007

http://traffic.libsyn.com/winemakersacademy/wma007.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: iTunes | Android | RSSCleaning and Sanitizing Wine Making Equipment One of the most important and time consuming parts of the wine making process is cleaning and sanitizing. While it seems pretty straight forward at first there are some technical aspects that are important to understand so that you can be sure you’re properly preparing your equipment. In this episode of Winemaker’s Academy we’ll take a look at exactly what’s entailed with cleaning and sanitizing separately. Also, we’ll dispel some of the confusion that occurs when the term sterilizing is used instead of sanitizing. Wine Making Questions There are also some great listener and reader questions covering a wine array of tipics. Here’s a list of the specific questions addressed in this show: What temperature should my finished wine be stored at? What is an acceptable amount of lees to transfer when racking? None? How long after bottling should I wait to open my wine? How long does sanitized equipment stay sanitized? Can I dissolve my potassium metabisulfite in wine instead of water? I think I overheated my fermenting wine. What do I do now? Also Mentioned The following products and articles were mentioned in this episode of the podcast: Potassium Metabisulfite Powder(affiliate) Star San Commercial Sanitizer(affiliate) How to Restart a Stuck Fermentation Bottle Trees(affiliate) More information on cleaning and sanitizing. Top Photo By: Tim...

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The Differences Between Cleaning, Sanitizing, and Sterilizing

While this may seem like a trivial distinction to make different wine making resources will use these terms interchangeably and it can get confusing. Cleaning Simply put, cleaning wine making equipment is to remove dirt and debris. This can be done by using warm water and your hands or a sponge to remove the big stuff. You don’t want to use soaps or detergents as these can leave behind a residue of their own. What cleaning does not do is remove any micro-organisms. Cleaning by itself is not enough to ensure that you won’t have any undesirable tastes due to rogue micro-organisms. Sanitizing Wine making requires clean and sanitary tools and vessels (carboys and fermenters). Sanitizing, often done using chemicals, removes most micro-organisms from your equipment. “Most” being the key word. Chemicals such as potassium metabisulfite have been used to accomplish this. However, as today there are much more effective chemicals on the market. Star San is one of the best sanitizing agents available. It’s the one I use and recommend. To sanitize your equipment you merely dip it into a sanitizing solution. That’s it. Many do not require you to rinse the sanitizer off before using it. However, chemicals that are not generally used in making wine should be rinsed off so that you don’t affect the fermentation or the taste of your finished wine. Sterilizing Sterilizing goes one step further than sanitizing. This is a process used to remove all micro-organisms. Nothing survives sterilization. Not yeast, bacteria, or fungus. Generally speaking winemakers do not sterilize their equipment. It takes special machines and or very harsh chemicals to accomplish complete annihilation of all micro-organisms. Chemiclas such as chlorine and hydrogen peroxide can be used to sterilize equipment, however, they must be used at concentrations many times more potent than what’s available to the public. Clean and Sanitized Wine making equipment needs to be clean and sanitized. A quick dip of a dirty hydrometer in a sanitizing solution will sanitize the hydrometer…and the dirt that’s on it. It’s not enough for your equipment to be merely clean either. While some micro-organisms contribute to a wine others turn it into vinegar or worse. How to Effectively Clean and Sanitize Your Wine Making Equipment 1. In warm water use a soft sponge or your hand wipe down all surfaces. Carboys and bottles will require a brush. Do not use dish soap or detergents as these will leave a residue behind. 2. Rinse off your clean equipment to ensure all the dirt has been washed away. 3. Dip equipment into a sanitizing solution such as potassium metabisulfite or Star San (affiliate). 4. Rinse off the sanitizing solution in warm water. 5. Allow your equipment to dry before using. It helps to have a sanitized surface to work on. Setting clean and sanitary equipment down on a dirty surface will undo all the hard work you just put into your equipment. Of course carboys and fermenters may sit on surfaces that have not been sanitized as long as the inside of these vessels remains clean. I recommend cleaning and sanitizing your work surface completely. It’s just good practice. Cleaning and sanitizing equipment is not fun nor is it the sexy...

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