Kerry’s Magnificent Mango Wine Recipe

Kerry’s Magnificent Mango Wine Recipe

This mango wine recipe was contributed by Winemaker’s Academy member Kerry. The recipe, she tells me, was passed to her by an organic mango farmer she knows. Kerry does not use sulfites in her wine so you won’t see any references to potassium metabisulfite or campden tablets. This is part of the reason why she recommends using “cooled boiled water” in several of the steps below. Should you decide to add sulfites to your wine simply follow the instructions included with the potassium metabisulfite or campden tablets of your choice. If you need some guidance on sulfite additions check out the following article which includes a calculator: Adding Potassium Metabisulfite to Wine. However, it would be an interesting experiment to go without sulfites if you’ve never tried it. Kerry’s Magnificent Mango Wine recipe: Ingredients 2kg mango pulp (4.5 lbs) Cooled boiled water (enough to bring total volume of liquids to approximately 1 US gallon) 1 tablespoon pectinase 1 teaspoon Lalvin EC1118 yeast 1 heaped teaspoon Lallemand Fermaid A yeast nutrient 1.5kg sugar added in 500gm portions over time. May not use all of the last portion. *(that’s 3.3 lbs of sugar in 2.5 cup increments) Instructions Peel the mangos and cut all flesh away from the seed. Taking the “meat” of the mango squeeze it through your fingers to make a pulp. Pour boiling water over the mangos in a large pot then cover and allow it to cool. (Note from Matt: I recommend using a nylon mesh bag to contain the fruit). Mix 1 tablespoon pectinase in cooled boiled water and stir into the mango must. Leave covered 24 hrs. *For those of you wishing to use sulfites, now would be a good time for an initial dose. Dissolve 500 grams of sugar (2.5 cups) in a small amount of cooled boiled water and add it to your mango must. Stir in yeast and yeast nutrient mixed with a small amount of cooled boiled water. Cover and set aside. Stir at least once every 24 hrs for 5-7 days. When the frothy activity subsides it’s time to strain. Strain into a demijohn (aka carboy) and seal it with an airlock. When the fermentation activity dies down (could be between several weeks to several months) rack into a clean carboy and add the next 500 gram dose of sugar in a small amount of mango must or in cooled boiled water. Repeat step 10 untill fermentation ceases. After fermentation has stopped completely even after adding more sugar rack and add any remaining sugar required to sweeten it to suit your taste. When the mango wine has cleared and is inactive – taste and bottle. Please let us know if you try this mango wine recipe out down in the comments. Let us know how it goes and if you did anything differently. Update!!! Here is a photograph of Kerry’s Mango Wine as of August 5th, 2014. Looking good! (See the comment section below for the full details on how this wine is progressing) The recipe presented on this page is licensed under the¬†Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International...

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