Kerry’s Magnificent Mango Wine Recipe

Kerry’s Magnificent Mango Wine Recipe

This mango wine recipe was contributed by Winemaker’s Academy member Kerry. The recipe, she tells me, was passed to her by an organic mango farmer she knows. Kerry does not use sulfites in her wine so you won’t see any references to potassium metabisulfite or campden tablets. This is part of the reason why she recommends using “cooled boiled water” in several of the steps below. Should you decide to add sulfites to your wine simply follow the instructions included with the potassium metabisulfite or campden tablets of your choice. If you need some guidance on sulfite additions check out the following article which includes a calculator: Adding Potassium Metabisulfite to Wine. However, it would be an interesting experiment to go without sulfites if you’ve never tried it. Kerry’s Magnificent Mango Wine recipe: Ingredients 2kg mango pulp (4.5 lbs) Cooled boiled water (enough to bring total volume of liquids to approximately 1 US gallon) 1 tablespoon pectinase 1 teaspoon Lalvin EC1118 yeast 1 heaped teaspoon Lallemand Fermaid A yeast nutrient 1.5kg sugar added in 500gm portions over time. May not use all of the last portion. *(that’s 3.3 lbs of sugar in 2.5 cup increments) Instructions Peel the mangos and cut all flesh away from the seed. Taking the “meat” of the mango squeeze it through your fingers to make a pulp. Pour boiling water over the mangos in a large pot then cover and allow it to cool. (Note from Matt: I recommend using a nylon mesh bag to contain the fruit). Mix 1 tablespoon pectinase in cooled boiled water and stir into the mango must. Leave covered 24 hrs. *For those of you wishing to use sulfites, now would be a good time for an initial dose. Dissolve 500 grams of sugar (2.5 cups) in a small amount of cooled boiled water and add it to your mango must. Stir in yeast and yeast nutrient mixed with a small amount of cooled boiled water. Cover and set aside. Stir at least once every 24 hrs for 5-7 days. When the frothy activity subsides it’s time to strain. Strain into a demijohn (aka carboy) and seal it with an airlock. When the fermentation activity dies down (could be between several weeks to several months) rack into a clean carboy and add the next 500 gram dose of sugar in a small amount of mango must or in cooled boiled water. Repeat step 10 untill fermentation ceases. After fermentation has stopped completely even after adding more sugar rack and add any remaining sugar required to sweeten it to suit your taste. When the mango wine has cleared and is inactive – taste and bottle. Please let us know if you try this mango wine recipe out down in the comments. Let us know how it goes and if you did anything differently. Update!!! Here is a photograph of Kerry’s Mango Wine as of August 5th, 2014. Looking good! (See the comment section below for the full details on how this wine is progressing) The recipe presented on this page is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International...

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David’s Blackberry Port

David’s Blackberry Port

This Blackberry Port recipe was written and contributed by David Knoll. Where I live in Oregon, Blackberries grow as weeds. In July when Blackberries are ripe, I can walk across the road to my neighbor’s property and pick 5 gallons of Blackberries along his pasture in about 2 hrs. They are big and juicy. Blackberry Port was one of my first wines I ever made because of the abundance of available free fruit. If blackberries are not available where you live, growing wild, you can purchase frozen blackberries at the store. I usually make 6 gal. at a time, but will give the recipe for 1 gal. Things you will need: 15 lbs of blackberries (6.8 kg) 3 lbs of sugar (0.9 kg) ½ tsp Pectic Enzyme 1 tsp yeast Nutrient 1 pkg Red Star Pasteur Champagne yeast 1 campden tablet After the wine is finished you’ll also need: Potassium sorbate sugar to taste brandy Making Blackberry Port Fermentation Start by taking frozen blackberries out of their package and placing them in your primary fermenter or food grade bucket to unthaw. Usually takes 24 hrs. When the blackberries are unfrozen stir in 1 tsp of pectic enzyme per gal and yeast nutrient. Place a loose cover or cloth over the fermenter top. I do not add acid blend, because I don’t add water to my blackberries. Undiluted they have enough acid in them already. Take yeast out of its packet and place it in ¼ cup of warm water for ½ hr to bloom. Gently pour yeast over your blackberry must. Then replace a loose cover. Within 24 hours you should have an active fermentation. Stir in yeast. As your must pushes up a cap each day punch it down and mix liquid with solids twice a day. Fermentation should last 7-10 days. After about 1 week you will notice a slowing of the cap build up each day. When you can easily mix the solids with the liquid without any effort, it is time to separate the liquids from the pulp and seeds. Pour off the free run liquid from the solids and place in a sanitized bucket. Place the pulp in a press bag and squeeze out all liquids into your bucket. Secondary Fermentation Put all the liquids in a carboy or glass container about ⅘ full and put a sanitized air lock on the top. You will probably notice a small amount of burping as the last of the fermentation takes place. This may take as long as a month. At this point it is easy to get a liquid sample to test with your triple scale hydrometer. We are looking for a reading of 1.000 that indicates all sugar is gone. Once the sugar is gone and the yeast has nothing to eat, it will slowly die. The best indication that this is happening is that lees (sediment) will form a pink layer in the bottom of your carboys. And the liquid above will turn dark black. Rack off all clear dark liquid into a clean carboy, while leaving the sediment at the bottom. Discard...

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Matt’s Strawberry Melomel

Matt’s Strawberry Melomel

A strawberry mead recipe by Matt Williams. This was my first fruit wine that I ever made. I used frozen strawberries from the grocery store and a local Colorado honey. It took about 3 weeks to fully ferment and I recommend giving it a full six months or more to clear. I opted not to degas the mead as the tiny amount of carbonation added a nice touch to the finished product. The final alcohol content was 14.25% prior to back sweetening (optional). Ingredients   4lbs frozen strawberries 48 oz Raw, Unfiltered Honey Water (enough to total 1.25 gallons of total liquids) 1 tsp Acid Blend ¼ tsp Tannin ½ tsp Pectic Enzyme 1 tsp Yeast Nutrients 1 pkg Premier Cuvee Yeast Potassium Metabisulfite / campden tablets (measure per manufacturers recommendation) Optional if back sweetening Additional honey to taste Potassium sorbate (measure per manufacturers recommendation) Always refer to the additive manufacturers instructions on how much to add as concentrations may vary. Making Strawberry Melomel Starting Fermentation Begin by setting out the frozen strawberries to thaw in the packaging they came in. Once the fruit has thawed sanitize your wine making equipment including: a hydrometer, test jar, a mixing bowl, primary fermenter, and a stirring spoon. Line the mixing bowl with a sanitized nylon bag (like this one). Open the bag of strawberries and empty the contents into the lined bowl. Lift up on the bag and allow the juice to drain into the bowl. Place the bag of strawberries into the primary fermenter. Pour the honey and enough water into the mixing bowl so that you have a total of 1.25 gallons of must. It can be helpful to heat the honey slightly so that it is easier to pour and mix in. There’s no need to boil the honey though, it is naturally anti-microbial. Once all the liquids have been thoroughly mixed in measure the specific gravity and temperature of the must and calculate the temperature corrected specific gravity. Record this in your wine making log. Here’s a free wine making log you can print if you need it. Next measure the appropriate amount of acid blend, tannins, pectic enzyme, and yeast nutrients for the 1.25 gallons of must you have. Different additive manufacturers make additives of different concentrations so be sure to go by what your specific container has labeled on it. The potassium metabisulfite is added after fermentation, not now. The last thing to do at this stage is hydrate your yeast and add it to the must. I recommend hydrating over adding the yeast in a dry form in order to help it get going. Honey is already hard for yeast to ferment and hydrating helps them get started. During the first five days squeeze the mesh bag of fruit daily to help extract flavor, color, and aroma compounds. Check the specific gravity every other day. Rack your mead to the secondary fermenter and discard the fruit once the mead reaches a specific gravity of 1.030. Secondary Fermentation Allow your strawberry melomel to continue fermenting for six weeks. Check the specific gravity and record your...

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