The Specifics of Specific Gravity – WMA004

The Specifics of Specific Gravity – WMA004

http://traffic.libsyn.com/winemakersacademy/wma004.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: iTunes | Android | RSSSpecific Gravity Specific gravity is one of the most important measurements a winemaker makes. It tells us how much sugar we have, how far along fermentation might be, when it ends, and how much alcohol was produced. In this episode of the Winemaker’s Academy Podcast the main topic and the quick tip both focus on specific gravity. What it means and how to get an accurate result when measuring it. Special Announcement Also in this episode there’s a very special announcement. The Winemaker’s Academy Recipe section has been launched. What makes this so special is that I’m looking for tried and true wine making recipes from winemakers like you. To see what we already have in there check the Wine Making Recipes page. If you would like to submit your own recipe please read Submit a Recipe for more information. The Questions As always there were some great wine making questions addressed in the Question and Answer segment. Here they are in order of appearance: Do I have to use the sorbate? I accidentally added the sorbate in the beginning of the wine making process. How do I process large quantities of apple juice for wine? There’s too much oak in my peach wine. Now what? How do I keep my wine safe while making another batch to blend with the first one? Pages & Products The following pages and products were discussed in this weeks episode: Specific Gravity Temperature Correction Calculator How to Use a Hydrometer (video) Hydrometer Test Jar Waterless Air Lock Do you have questions or topic suggestions for the show? Please email me and let me know about...

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Specific Gravity Temperature Correction Calculator

Specific Gravity Temperature Correction Calculator

All hydrometers are calibrated to be accurate at a given temperature. Most newer hydrometers are calibrated for 68 degrees (F). Because the density of fluids changes as their temperature changes if you don’t measure your specific gravity at your hydrometers calibration temperature you’re going to get an inaccurate reading. While the correction may be small for a single reading if you don’t correct it it becomes increasingly difficult to compare readings over time. For instance, if you take an original specific gravity reading at 75 degrees (F) and a final reading at 65 degrees (F) you can’t compare these readings because the fluid densities are different at the different temperatures. You must correct each of your readings for temperature differences before you can compare them. Specific Gravity Temperature Correction Calculator This calculator makes temperature corrections easy to figure out. Be sure to check and see what your hydrometer is calibrated for, while most hydrometers are calibrated to be accurate at 68 degrees (F) / 20 degrees (C) not all of them are. Inputs Specific Gravity Measured Temperature of Your Sample (F or C) Hydrometer Calibration Temperature (F or C) Temperature scale Results Temperature Correction: Temperature Corrected Specific Gravity: The calibration temperature for your hydrometer should be printed on the scale. If it’s not printed there you can calibrate it yourself by putting your hydrometer in water samples at difference temperatures and seeing when it reads 1.000. That will be your calibration temperature. The formulas used to make the temperature corrections are based on water density data presented in the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics 53rd Edition...

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Using a Hydrometer for Making Wine

Using a Hydrometer for Making Wine

The hydrometer is the testing instrument you’ll use most when making wine. While it looks simple enough it does take some practice to fully understand both how to use it and what it’s telling you. I’ll show you how to use a hydrometer as well as what the results mean in this three and a half minute video. You’ll get to actually see the hydrometer used to measure the specific gravity of tap water, a sugar solution, as well as a finished wine so you’ll see the differences. After the video I’ll share some additional tips on getting the best reading you can from this extremely useful instrument.   Tips on Using the Hydrometer 1. Give the hydrometer a gentle spin as you lower it down into the liquid you’re measuring. This helps shake loose any bubbles that cling to the hydrometer which will affect the reading you get. 2. If  your wine is still fermenting you’ll need to take the reading as fast as you can before too many bubbles collect on the hydrometer. You could try shaking your sample vigorously in a test jar in order to degas is. 3. Always remove a sample to test fermented wine. While it is possible to take a reading from the primary fermenter you won’t be at a good viewing angle to get an accurate reading. More importantly the longer you leave your wine uncovered to take the reading the more oxygen you’ll be exposing it to. 4. Be aware of the temperature of your wine when you take your specific gravity reading. These instruments are calibrated to take correct readings at only one temperature. For many hydrometers that is 68 degrees (F). Any warmer or cooler and you’ll need to correct your reading to get the true specific gravity. Here’s a link to a specific gravity temperature correction calculator I put together for you. Also, here’s a link to a similar hydrometer used in the video. This is an affiliate link so if you use it you will be helping to support Winemaker’s Academy. If you these tips and the video useful please let me know in the...

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